Monday, November 12, 2012

"End Notes" yield up such nuggets as "Dr. Fred and the Spanish Lady: Fighting the Killer Flu" 1918 Vancouver

Practically every book written, in its last pages, has a section called either "End Notes" or "Reference" to keep the reader abreast of from where quotes were taken for research in THE book.


Look at it this way, the book may be new, but the data at the back of the book is a GOLD mine of information just waiting to be re-discovered.   Those References, those End Notes, those Bibliographies, were written before the NEW book was even thought about, probably written before the Author was born.


In an earlier Post, Friday, November 26, 2010, which we called: 

"Appropriation, Taxes and Tolls" and now Shadow tolls, Some things never change

 We mentioned this book:    "The Coast Connection, R.G. Harveyavailable in your local library, but its now available on-line via Google  under something called What????:   

THE Eusmesnm/G ms nrurs OF CANADA

www.eic-ici.ca/hawp9.pdf
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - Quick View
by RG Harvey - 2001 - Related articles
Scottish born, Bob Harvey graduated in civil engineering from the University ...... In The Coast Connection, R.G. Harvey examines the history of road construction ...

 So here I am today reading:

SNIP
 ENDNOTES

This is Page one of three 

1 Task Force on Crown Timber Disposal, “Forest Tenures in British Columbia,” (Report prepared by the Task Force on Crown Timber Disposal, 1974), i; British Columbia, Forest Service of British Columbia, Timber Tenures in British Columbia: Managing Public Forests in the Public Interest ([Victoria]: Ministry of Forests and Range, 2006), 2.
2 British Columbia, Ministry of Forests, Timber Tenure System in British Columbia ([Victoria]: Ministry of Forests, 1997), 1.
3 Donald Mackay, Empire of Wood: The MacMillan Bloedel Story (Vancouver: Douglas & McIntyre, 1982), 19; Cortex Consultants Ltd., “A Quick Reference: British Columbia’s Timber Tenure System,” http://www.cortex.ca/case.html/TimberTenSysWeb_Nov2001.pdf (Accessed 4 June 2009).
4 Construction needs in the colony and export markets in California fuelled early demands for Vancouver Island timber in the 1850s. For a history of the early timber industry on Vancouver Island see W. Kaye Lamb, “Early Lumbering on Vancouver Island, 1844-1866 [Parts I and II],” British Columbia Historical Quarterly Vol. 2 No. 1 (1938), 31-53, 95-121.
5 “An ordinance for regulating the acquisition of Land in British Columbia,” in Ordinances Passed by the Legislative Council of British Columbia (New Westminster: New Government Printing Office, 1865).
6 Ministry of Agriculture and Lands, “Crown Land Factsheet,” (Accessed 4 June 2009); David Haley and Harry Nelson, “British Columbia’s Forest Tenure System in a Changing World: Challenges and Opportunities,” Vancouver: BC Forum on Forest Economics and Policy, 2006), n.p.
7 Mackay, Empire of Wood, 15; Richard A. Rajala, Clearcutting the Pacific Rain Forest: Production, Science , and Regulation (Vancouver: UBC Press, 1998) , xviii. The terms of BC’s entry to Confederation in 1871 guaranteed provincial control over lands and resources, including timber. Previously, the colonies of Vancouver Island and British Columbia controlled disposals of lands and resources since acquiring these rights from the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1860.
8 British Columbia, Final Report of Inquiry on Timber and Forestry 1909-1910 (Victoria: King’s Printer, 1910), D11; Statutes of British Columbia [SBC] (1888), ch. 16 s. 8, 18; SBC (1891) ch. 15 s. 13.
9 British Columbia Sessional Papers, “Public Accounts, 1899,” (Victoria: Queen’s Printer, 1900), 20.
10 Rajala, Clearcutting the Pacific Rain Forest, xviii, xix. Between 1888 and 1891, Crown land leases were for thirty-year terms at an annual rental rate of ten cents per acre and royalty rate of fifty cents per thousand feet of trees cut. British Columbia, Final Report of Inquiry on Timber and Forestry 1909-1910, D11.
11 SBC (1901) ch. 30 s. 6. No longer issued after 1905, pulp leases were subsequently renewed and converted to Special Timber Licenses in 1926 and 1927. British Columbia Forest Resources Commission, “A History of Forest Tenure Policy in British Columbia 1858-1978” (October 1989), 3. The 1912 Forest Act created pulp licenses allowing the cutting of wood for the manufacture of pulp. SBC (1912) ch. 17.
12 SBC (1903) ch. 30; SBC (1905) ch. 33.
13 SBC (1905) ch. 33.
14 British Columbia, Final Report of Inquiry on Timber and Forestry, D13.
15 Ibid., D7, D43-D44, D54-D55.
16 SBC (1912) ch. 17 s. 4.
17 SBC (1912) ch. 17 s. 12, 25.
18 British Columbia, Royal Commission on Forest Resources in British Columbia, Timber Rights and Forest Policy: The Report of the Royal Commission on Forest Resources in British Columbia (Victoria: Queen’s Printer, 1976), 3.
19 British Columbia, Report of the Commissioner Relating to the Forest Resources of British Columbia (Victoria: King’s Printer, 1945), Q127, Q143.
20 Ibid., Q127.   Sixth hit down, I think, are you still clicking and reading here folks
21 SBC (1947) ch. 38.
22 Province of British Columbia, Department of Lands and Forests, “Report of the Forest Service, 1948,” (Victoria: King’s Printer, 1949), LL81; Province of British Columbia, Department of Lands and Forests, “Report of the Forest Service, 1953,” (Victoria: King’s Printer, 1955), 131.
23 Rajala, Clearcutting the Pacific Rain Forest, 87.
24 British Columbia, Report of the Commissioner Relating to the Forest Resources of British Columbia [Two Volumes] (Victoria: Queen’s Printer, 1956), 399-400, 416, 528.SNIP

Or how about this Reference, on pages 7 and 8 (items #1 through to #39)


1 The estimated death toll varies, ranging from about 20 million to 40-50 million, to 100 million. J.K. Taubenberger, D.M. Morens, “1918 influenza: the mother of all pandemics,” Emerging Infectious Diseases [serial on the Internet], January 2006. Available from http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol12no01/05-0979.htm See also John M. Barry, “The site of the original of the 1918 influenza pandemic and its public health implications,” Journal of Translational Medicine 2: 3, (2004). “Ten things you need to know about pandemic influenza”, Weekly Epidemiological Record, No. 49/50 (December 2005).
2 Janice P. Dickin McGinnis, “The impact of epidemic influenza: Canada, 1918-1919,” in Medicine in Canadian Society: Historical Perspectives, ed. S.E.D. Shortt, (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1981), 447.
3 McGinnis, “Impact of Epidemic,” 449.
4Ibid., 451.
5 Ibid., 458. Public Health Agency of Canada, The Chief Public Health Officer’s Report on the State of Public Health in Canada, (Ottawa: Chief Public Health Officer, 2008), 11.
6 Susan Goldenberg, “Killer Flu,” The Beaver 86, Iss. 5 (Oct/Nov. 2006). Eileen Pettigrew, The Silent Enemy: Canada and the Deadly Flu of 1918, (Saskatoon: Western Producer Prairie Book, 1983) 13, 134.
7 McGinnis, “Impact of Epidemic,” 460.
8 “An Act Respecting the Department of Health” was assented to on June 6, 1919. Betty O’Keefe and Ian MacDonald, Dr. Fred and the Spanish Lady: Fighting the Killer Flu, (Surrey, BC: Heritage House, 2004), 183. Pettigrew, Silent Enemy, 134.
9 O’Keefe, Dr. Fred, 159-60. Pettigrew, Silent Enemy, 71. [Medical Health Officer], “Report of the Medical Health Officer [1918],” in Corporation of the City of Vancouver Annual Report 1918, (Vancouver: The Corporation, 1919), 72.
10 B.C. OIC 2399/18. “Health Act,” RSBC 1911, ch. 98, sec. 13. Margaret W. Andrews, “Epidemic and Public Health: Influenza in Vancouver, 1918-1919,” BC Studies 34, (Summer 1977), 30-34. BC OIC 2400/18. [Medical Health Officer], “Report of the Medical Health Officer [1918]”, 73.
11 British Columbia, Department of Education, “Annual Report 1919,” in Sessional Papers British Columbia Vol. 1 – 1920, (Victoria: [n.p., 1920], A18.
12 British Columbia, Provincial Board of Health, “Report of the Provincial Board of Health [1919],” in Sessional Papers British Columbia Vol. 1 – 1920, (Victoria: n.p., 1919) B6.
13 “Fifty thousand is cost of ‘flu’ for province to date,” Victoria Daily Times, 18 November, 1918, 8.
14 O’Keefe, Dr. Fred, 85, 92, 96-97. [Medical Health Officer],“Report of the Medical Health Officer [1918]”, 72. British Columbia, Provincial Board of Health, “Report of the Provincial Board of Health [1919],” B6. McGinnis, “Impact of Epidemic,” 455.
15 British Columbia, Provincial Board of Health, “Report of the Provincial Board of Health [1919],” B6. [Medical Health Officer],“Report of the Medical Health Officer [1918]”, 73.
16 British Columbia, Provincial Board of Health, “Report of the Provincial Board of Health [1919],” B5.
17 World Health Organization, Pandemic Influenza Preparedness and Response: a WHO Guidance Document, (France: WHO, 2009), 13. N.J. Cox, “Global Epidemiology of Influenza: Past and Present,” Annual Review of Medicine 51, (2000), 413. Michael Tibayrenc, Encyclopedia of Infectious Diseases, ([n.p].: Wiley-Liss, 2007), 206. “Ten things you need to know about pandemic influenza”, Weekly Epidemiological Record, No. 49/50, (December 2005).
18 Edwin D. Kilbourne, “Influenza Pandemics of the 20th Century,” Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 12, No.1, January 2006, 10.
19 The basis for this statement was unclear. The statement was made in the “R.E. Dyer Lecture” published in Public Health Reports in 1958. The author was Dr. Richard E. Shope, a professor and member of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. Richard E. Shope, “The R.E. Dyer Lecture: Influenza: History, Epidemiology and Speculation” Public Health Reports 73, no. 2, (February 1958), 165.
20 Canada, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Influenza in Canada: Some Statistics on its Characteristics and Trends, (Ottawa: The Bureau, 1958), 6.
21 Canada, Department of National Health and Welfare, Annual Report 1958, (Ottawa: The Department, 1959), 59.“Asiatic flu vaccine here Oct. 1,” Times, 15 August 1957, p. 1. ‘No flu threat in BC-Martin,” Times, 17 August 1957, p.1.

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