Friday, November 24, 2017

Premier Gordon Campbell left it to Kevin Falcon to explain the $3 billion lost to HST as "A failed experiment,"

This morning's tea at Edgemont Village was interrupted by former Minister of Finance Kevin Falcon strolling into Delany's.  His presence reminded us of the $3 Billion squandered by the BC Liberals on the HST.   Money that could have been used to reduce, or totally eliminate, our MSP monthly billing for the past seven years.

Instead, the BC Liberals took their $3 Billion in 'dividends' from ICBC and BC Hydro to  "balance" their version of fudget budgets, sending both Crown Corporations on the road to insolvency.

Christy Clark's Site C  .... .... "A failed experiment,"

Vancouver Sun   Vaughn Palmer  July 20th, 2009
The fast ferries began their slow but relentless voyage to oblivion almost 10 years ago. The starting point was March 1, 2000 and the cabinet room of the then New Democratic Party government.

The father of the fast ferries, Glen Clark, was gone from the premier's office. A new minister for ferries, Joy MacPhail, was trying to explain why the close to half a billion dollars Clark had spent on the project was mostly gone along with him.  "A failed experiment," she called the project. Her briefing supplied new premier Ujjal Dosanjh and his ministers with the ugly details.   Snip

The BC HST began its slow but relentless voyage to oblivion almost two years ago.  The starting point was May 12, 2009 and the cabinet room of the then BC Liberal Party government.

The father of the HST, Gordon Campbell, was gone from the premier's office.  A new minister for finance, Kevin Falcon, was trying to explain why the close to $3 billion dollars Campbell had spent on the project was mostly gone along with him.
"A failed experiment," he called the project.  His briefing supplied new premier Christy Clark and her ministers with the ugly details.    Snip

SFU Editorial Cartoons

Then there was this earlier failed 'experiment' using tolls by Kevin Falcon as Minister of Highways:

 Just weeks after hard-hatted politicians kicked off construction of a new, 10-lane Port Mann bridge, the province of British Columbia announced Friday that it will be on the hook for the entire cost of the $3.3-billion project after failing to reach a deal with private-sector partners.

 Snip

"If you can't get financing for this kind of a project, where there is a guaranteed source of revenue over a lengthy period of time, what project can you get financing for?" Mr. Ralston said to reporters after the news conference.

The new Port Mann bridge is to be financed through commuter tolls of $3 each way for cars. The planned completion date is 2013.   - Globe and Mail

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