Sunday, October 27, 2013

The Hidden Story of the George Massey Bridge: Premier Clark announcement failed on details on bulk carriers.

Note: the tanker numbers (Document) discussed below are not exact counts as multiple sources report different figures. Also, in many instances tankers have been discussed as trips. When the term trips is used it refers to the arrival and departure of tankers; thus each tanker visit has two trips. This is important because each tanker is crossing B.C.’s coastline or adjacent waters twice. 

Note: "Port of Vancouver" includes the Fraser River Ports eg. Deas Island Tunnel too

Exxon Valdez  209,836 DWT 
 Video of the Oil Spill in Prince William Sound

Here are the typical (Wikipedia) four classifications of Tankers:

Panamax    500,000 barrels of Oil        80,001 DWT

Aframax    500,000 to 800,000  barrels of Oil     120,000 DWT
Forbidden in Port of  Vancouver

There is this Rider of Course:
The proposed expansion at the Westridge Terminal is based on the loading of Aframax tankers, the same tankers currently being loaded at Westridge.

 Suezmax  1,000,000 barrels of Oil        200,000    DWT
 (soon to be passing below the NEW George Massey bridge) 


Ultra Large Crude Carriers    3,000,000 barrels of Oil    320,000 DWT

ChinaMax........    Q-Max are largest LNG carriers     Seawaymax 



The US side of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, tankers greater than 125,000 deadweight tonnes are not permitted.

The Canadian side of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, tankers greater than 125,000 deadweight tonnes are being considered by Christy and Stephen.


A Suezmax is typically larger than 125,000 deadweight tonnes. Thus, Suezmax tankers would not be allowed to travel to US destinations via the same route where they are being considered for Canadian destinations.

Size and types of tankers

The size of the tankers is an additional consideration alongside the number of trips. The larger the tanker, the more oil it can carry. There are typically four classifications, ranging from the Panamax, with a capacity of roughly 500,000 barrels of oil, to the Ultra Large Crude Carriers, with an approximate three million barrel capacity.

Size and types of tankers

The size of the tankers is an additional consideration alongside the number of trips. The larger the tanker, the more oil it can carry. There are typically four classifications, ranging from the Panamax, with a capacity of roughly 500,000 barrels of oil, to the Ultra Large Crude Carriers, with an approximate three million barrel capacity.

The geographic features of the waterways that lead up to ports often present limitations on the size of the tankers that can use port facilities.  Currently, the only oil tankers operating in B.C. are those collecting crude from the Port of Vancouver.  Here, the largest possible size is the Aframax, which can carry between 500,000 and 800,000 barrels of oil. However, in the case of the Port of Vancouver, the Aframax tankers are forbidden from carrying a full load due to restrictions in the waterway.

Adjustments to the waterway along with expansions at the Port of Vancouver are being planned.

These changes would allow for full Aframax tankers, as well as the next class up, the Suezmax (capacity up to one million barrels of oil).

Snip

Comparison of Tanker sizes

At a flow rate of over 500,000 barrels per day and a commitment to having 225 oil tankers visit the Port of Kitimat a year, the Northern Gateway crude oil pipeline can be expected to see visits by Suezmax and Ultra Large Crude Carriers to transport product out of B.C. (see attachment 2 for a table outlining the different sizes of Northern Gateway tankers)

 Attachment 2:

Bottom example of three hulls:   Double Hulls have a weak point:

Single hull, Double bottom, and Double hull ship cross sections. Green lines are watertight; black structure is not watertight



BBC News Europe
The Costa Concordia can-opener gash is larger than the Double Hull Tankers current design. The weakest point of first contact is the outside corners.
Concordia Class10,000 DWT  
Length: 289.59 m (950.1 ft)  Beam: 35.5 m (116 ft)

Suezmax  1,000,000 barrels of Oil        200,000    DWT  
Length: 285 m   Beam: 45 m

(soon to be passing below the NEW George Massey bridge)

The Hidden Story

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

http://www.richmond-news.com/news/we-re-listening-to-the-people-1.671869